biodiverseed:

cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse. Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.

A very nice example of sheet mulching, a.k.a. “lasagna gardening." As the OP noted, these methods are very easily combined with hugelkultur.
Zoom Info
biodiverseed:

cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse. Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.

A very nice example of sheet mulching, a.k.a. “lasagna gardening." As the OP noted, these methods are very easily combined with hugelkultur.
Zoom Info
biodiverseed:

cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse. Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.

A very nice example of sheet mulching, a.k.a. “lasagna gardening." As the OP noted, these methods are very easily combined with hugelkultur.
Zoom Info
biodiverseed:

cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse. Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.

A very nice example of sheet mulching, a.k.a. “lasagna gardening." As the OP noted, these methods are very easily combined with hugelkultur.
Zoom Info
biodiverseed:

cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse. Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.

A very nice example of sheet mulching, a.k.a. “lasagna gardening." As the OP noted, these methods are very easily combined with hugelkultur.
Zoom Info
biodiverseed:

cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse. Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.

A very nice example of sheet mulching, a.k.a. “lasagna gardening." As the OP noted, these methods are very easily combined with hugelkultur.
Zoom Info
biodiverseed:

cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse. Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.

A very nice example of sheet mulching, a.k.a. “lasagna gardening." As the OP noted, these methods are very easily combined with hugelkultur.
Zoom Info
biodiverseed:

cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse. Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.

A very nice example of sheet mulching, a.k.a. “lasagna gardening." As the OP noted, these methods are very easily combined with hugelkultur.
Zoom Info
biodiverseed:

cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse. Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.

A very nice example of sheet mulching, a.k.a. “lasagna gardening." As the OP noted, these methods are very easily combined with hugelkultur.
Zoom Info
biodiverseed:

cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse. Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.
1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.
2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.
3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.
4. More kindling.
5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.
6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.
7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.
8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.
9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.
10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.Dobby the kitten approves.

A very nice example of sheet mulching, a.k.a. “lasagna gardening." As the OP noted, these methods are very easily combined with hugelkultur.
Zoom Info

biodiverseed:

cathyashford:

So my boyfriend just bought a house and it came with this dinky little glasshouse. Over the past couple of days I have been scavenging all the organic matter I could from around the property to make some nice hugelkultur-themed raised beds that will hopefully be functional and productive.

1. Harvested old bricks to build the walls.

2. Raided the kindling box for pinecones and small sticks.

3. Layered all the cardboard we had in the house for unpacking.

4. More kindling.

5. Added compost from the pile that was in varying stages of decomposition. Did a bit of weeding and chucked those in.

6. Began dismantling an ugly old camellia that was blocking the drive and added those bits plus some soil I stole from an outside bed.

7. Pruned a kowhai (native leguminous tree) and piled on the trimmings. Added another layer of bricks with gaps.

8. Discovered a bin full of two years’ worth of fallen leaves. On they went. Planted strawberries in the gaps in the walls.

9. Found a deep litter of needles under the one massive pine tree. Covered this with a generous sprinkling of lime to balance the p.H. and add calcium.

10. Finished it off with a thick layer of more soil borrowed from the tired old outdoors raised beds. Planted it with a first crop of salad greens and broad beans to help improve and stabilise the soil in preparation for summer when I will be planting tomatoes, basil, capsicums, chillis and aubergines.
Dobby the kitten approves.

A very nice example of sheet mulching, a.k.a. “lasagna gardening." As the OP noted, these methods are very easily combined with hugelkultur.

(via kierk)